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Who's going SOLO and with what?





It really is interesting the conversations that you can have on the twittersphere.  I recently posted a blog about Going Solo using SOLO taxonomy in my teaching and applying it to my own learning and work for my MA. I then posted a blog about technology tools and how they can be used for formative assessment and learning-oriented assessment.   Then a question was put to me that really got me thinking. 

"What technology tools are available that would incorporate the principles of SOLO taxonomy into them, in particular when assessing pupils' work?"
If an answer exists it certainly did not come to me.   Does such a technological tool exist?  Is there an app that could do this?  I immediately thought of how tools such as Nearpod,  Edmodo or ProProfs could provide fantastic opportunities for students to complete work at the extended abstract level that could be assessed by a teacher.  Engaging web-based applications such as  GetKahoot can be used at a very simple level and are very motivating for students of all levels.   The questions set in this application, as in the ones already mentioned, can be at a relational level and there is room for discussion too thus, depending on the answer, accessing the extended abstract.  I suppose with such tools the extended abstract also lies in getting the students to create the test themselves. 

So - going back to my question - I could see how such digital tools provide opportunities for students to push themselves beyond the relational but struggled more when it came to envisaging a digital assessment tool that would allow for online assessment of higher-order thinking skills.  Notability and similar apps and web-based applications such as Explain Everything or Educreations are flexible in that students' work can be marked and annotated by a teacher giving detailed written and voice feedback.  Hence opportunities for feedforward are extensive and the feedback can be rapid as work can be returned electronically.  However, I digress.  To return to my question relating to the affordances of digital technology, online assessment and the principles of SOLO taxonomy and whether the three can be intertwined and meshed together effectively I came to a realisation.  There was a key element missing. 

  1. digital technology
  2. online assessment
  3. principles of SOLO taxonomy
What brings these three elements together?  There are no prizes for guessing that it is the teacher.  It is the teacher who must know what tools are available.  It is the teacher who must know how these tools work and who must think creatively in how to use these tools and it is the teacher who must understand the principles of SOLO taxonomy. 

"A tool is only limited by its user."
Below is a table listing some apps and how I might use them in relation to the four levels described in SOLO taxonomy.  To be honest, I could imagine using the apps at every level. However, that's my list.  What would yours look like?  If you have any thoughts  on this topic. I would love to hear them.

Here they are with links to the iPad.  They are also available on other tablets, devices and on the web.



Extended abstract: iMoviethinglink, VideoScribe, Voice Record Pro,  iMindMap


Relational: Twitter, Wordpress, diigo, lino, explain everything


Multistructural: Prezi, Doceri, Mindmeister, Notability, scoop it!


Uni-structural: Memrise, Infinote, Skitch, Quizlet, Cloudart




For my choice of apps that would be suitable for Bloom's Taxonomy click here.

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